Displaying 91-105 of 296

Denise Guinn

Denise Guinn received her BA in chemistry from the University of California at San Diego and her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. She was a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University before joining Abbott Laboratories as a Research Scientist in the Pharmaceutical Products Discovery Research Group. In 1992, Dr. Guinn joined the department of chemistry at Regis University, in Denver, Colorado, as Clare Boothe Luce Professor, where she taught courses in general chemistry, organic chemistry, and the General, Organic, and Biochemistry course for nursing and allied health majors.  In 2008 she joined the College of New Rochelle, where she teaches organic chemistry, biochemistry, and the general, organic and biochemistry course.  Her area of research is synthetic organic chemistry; she has published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, the Journal of the American Chemical Society, and the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. She has two college aged sons, and lives in Nyack, New York, with her Golden retriever Buddy.


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Damodar Gujarati

DAMODAR GUJARATI is Emeritus Professor of Economics, US Military Academy, West Point, New York. Professor Gujarati is the author of several successful econometrics textbooks, such as Basic Econometrics 5e and Essentials of Econometrics 4e.


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Ellen Gundlach

Ellen Gundlach has been teaching introductory statistics and probability classes at Purdue University as a continuing lecturer since 2002, with prior experience teaching mathematics or chemistry classes at Purdue, Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, The Ohio State University, and Florida State University.  She is an associate editor of CAUSEweb and editor of the MERLOT Statistics Board.  Her research interests include K12 outreach activities (ASA’s first Hands-on Statistics Activity grand prize winner in 2010), online and hybrid teaching (Indiana Council for Continuing Education’s Course of the Year award in 2011), T.A. training, academic misconduct, statistical literacy, and using social media in statistics courses. She enjoys spending time with her sons Philip and Callum, playing the flute with several local groups, and supporting (and formerly skating with) the Lafayette Brawlin’ Dolls roller derby team. 


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Stephen G. Hall

STEPHEN G. HALL is Professor of Economics at Leicester University, UK and Visiting Professor at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. He is Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, Member of the Executive Committee of the UN project LINK and Editor of Economic Modelling.


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Christina Noring Hammond

Christina Hammond, retired, was Lecturer and Coordinator of Laboratory Instruction in the Chemistry Department at Vassar College from 1981 to 2006.  Hammond received a B.S. from the State University of New York at Albany, and came to Vassar in 1961 as a master’s degree student in chemistry and a graduate teaching assistant. She joined the faculty as a laboratory instructor in 1963. Her work concentrated on developing new experiments for these courses, and several of her experiments have been published in the Journal of Chemical Education. She has coauthored six organic chemistry laboratory texts published in the last 10 years.


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Daniel C. Harris

Dan Harris was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1948.  He earned degrees in Chemistry from MIT in 1968 and Caltech 1973 and was a postdoc at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.  After teaching at the University of California at Davis from 1975-1980 and at Franklin and Marshall College from 1980-1983, he moved to the Naval Air Systems Command at China Lake, California, where he is now a Senior Scientist and Esteemed Fellow.  While teaching analytical chemistry at Davis, he wrote his lectures in bound form for his students.  This volume caught the attention of publishers' representatives wandering through the college bookstore.  The first edition of Quantitative Chemical Analysis was published in 1982.  The first edition of Exploring Chemical Analysis came out in 1996.  Both have undergone regular revision.  Dan is also co-author of Symmetry and Spectroscopy published in 1978 by Oxford University Press and now available from Dover Press.  His book Materials for Infrared Windows and Domes was published by SPIE press in 1999.  Dan and his wife Sally were married in 1970.  They have two children and four grandchildren.  Sally's work on every edition of the books is essential to their quality and accuracy.


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Daniel L. Hartl

Daniel L. Hartl is the Higgins Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. He has taught highly popular courses in genetics and evolution at the introductory and advanced levels. His lab studies molecular evolutionary genetics and population genetics and genomics. Dr. Hartl is the recipient of the Samuel Weiner Outstanding Scholar Award and the Medal of the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohm Naples. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as President of the Genetics Society of America and President of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. Dr. Hartl’s Ph.D. was awarded by the University of Wisconsin, and he did post-doctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty, he served on the faculties of the University of Minnesota, Purdue University, and Washington University Medical School. In addition to publishing more than 350 scientific articles, Dr. Hartl has authored or coauthored 30 books.


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Bradley A. Hartlaub

Brad Hartlaub joined the Kenyon faculty in 1990. He is a nonparametric statistician, and his research deals with rank-based tests for detecting interaction. He has published research articles on count or rank based statistical methods in the Journal of Nonparametric Statistics, The Canadian Journal of Statistics, and Environmental and Ecological Statistics. He has served as the Chief Reader of the AP Statistics Program and is an active member of the American Statistical Association's Section on Statistical Education. Brad was selected as a Fellow of the American Statistical Association in 2006. He has served the College as Chair of the Mathematics Department, Chair of the Division of Natural Sciences, a member of the Self Study Committee, and a member of the Committee on Academic Standards. He has received research grants to support his work with undergraduate students from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Council on Undergraduate Research. His current project is a collaborative effort with students and faculty members in the departments of biology and mathematics and deals with modeling metabolic rates for Manduca sexta.


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Thomas Heinzen

Tom Heinzen was a 29 year-old college freshman, began graduate school when their fourth daughter was one week old, and is still amazed that he and Donna somehow managed to stay married. A magna cum laude graduate of Rockford College, he earned his Ph.D. in social psychology at the State University of New York at Albany in just three years. He published his first book on frustration and creativity in government two years later, was a research associate in public policy until he was fired over the shape of a graph, consulted for the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, and then began a teaching career at William Paterson State University of New Jersey. He founded the psychology club, established an undergraduate research conference, and has been awarded various teaching honors while continuing to write journal articles, books, plays, and two novels that support the teaching of general psychology and statistics.  He is also the editor of Many Things to Tell You, a volume of poetry by elderly writers.  Tom's wife Donna is a physician assistant who has also volunteered her time in relief work following Hurricane Mitch and Hurricane Katrina. Their daughters are now scattered from Bangladesh to Mississippi to New Jersey and work in public health, teaching, and medicine. He is a mediocre French horn player, an enthusiastic but mediocre tennis player, and an ardent baseball fan (Go Cubs!).


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H. Craig Heller

H. Craig Heller is the Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor in Biological Sciences and Human Biology at Stanford University. He has taught in the core biology courses at Stanford since 1972 and served as Director of the Program in Human Biology, Chairman of the Biolo-gical Sciences Department, and Associate Dean of Research. Dr. Heller is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a recipient of the Walter J. Gores Award for excellence in teaching and the Kenneth Cuthberson Award for Exceptional Service to Stanford University. His research is on the neurobiology of sleep and circadian rhythms, mammalian hibernation, the regulation of body temperature, the physiology of human performance, and the neurobiology of learning. He has done research on a huge variety of animals and physiolo-gical problems, including from sleeping kangaroo rats, diving seals, hibernating bears, photo-periodic hamsters, and exercising athletes. Dr. Heller has extended his enthusiasm for promoting active learning via the development of a two-year curriculum in human biology for the middle grades, through the production of Virtual Labs—interactive computer-based modules to teach physiology.


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Displaying 91-105 of 296