Displaying 16-30 of 287

Jeremy M. Berg

Jeremy M. Berg received his B.S. and M.S degrees in Chemistry from Stanford University (where he did research with Keith Hodgson and Lubert Stryer) and
his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Harvard with Richard Holm. He then completed a postdoctoral fellowship with Carl Pabo in Biophysics at Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Johns Hopkins from 1986 to 1990. He then moved to Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine as Professor and Director of the Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, where he remained until 2003. From 2003 to 2011,
he served as Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. In 2011, he moved to the University of Pittsburgh
where he is Associate Senior Vice Chancellor for Science Strategy and Planning and a faculty member in the Department of Computational and Systems Biology. He
is a recipient of the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry (1994), the Eli Lilly Award for Fundamental Research in Biological Chemistry (1995), the
Maryland Outstanding Young Scientist of the Year (1995), the Harrison Howe Award from the Rochester Section of the American Chemical Society (1997),
the Howard Schachman Public Service Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2011), and the Public Service Award from the
American Chemical Society (2011). He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science. While at Johns Hopkins, he received the W. Barry Wood Teaching Award (selected by medical students), the Graduate Student Teaching
Award, and the Professor’s Teaching Award for the Preclinical Sciences.


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Arnold Berk

Arnold Berk is Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics and a member of the Molecular Biology Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Berk is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is one of the original discoverers of RNA splicing and of mechanisms for gene control in viruses. His laboratory studies the molecular interactions that regulate transcription nitiation in mammalian cells, focusing particular attention on transcription factors encoded by oncogenes and tumor suppressors. He teaches introductory courses in molecular biology and virology and an advanced course in cell biology of the nucleus.


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Andrew Berry

Andrew Berry is Lecturer in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and an undergraduate advisor in the Life Sciences at Harvard University. He teaches in Harvard’s first-year Life Sciences program, as well as courses on evolution and Darwin. His research interests are in evolutionary biology and the history of science. He has coauthored two books: Infinite Tropics, a collection of the writings of Alfred Russel Wallace, and DNA: The Secret of Life, which is part history, part exploration of the controversies swirling around DNA-based technology. 


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Paul R. Bierman

Paul Bierman has been a professor of Geology and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont since 1993. His research and teaching expertise focus on the interaction of people and Earths dynamic surface. Bierman is a native of Baltimore, Maryland. For college, he moved north to Massachusetts, where he earned a bachelors degree in Geology at Williams College. After several years working as an environmental consultant in Boston, Bierman moved north again to the University of Washington in Seattle where he earned both a masters and doctoral degree in Geology. After a short post-doctoral interlude far to the south in Australia, Bierman has been a professor at the University of Vermont since 1993.

Bierman's research has taken him around the globe. He has studied erosion in Australia, South America, and several countries in Africa and the Middle East. In Greenland, Bierman and his graduate students are tracing the history of the Greenland Ice sheet over the last million years, an adventure that repeatedly takes them helicoptering over the ice. In Vermont, New Hampshire, and New York, Bierman and his students created the first record of storminess and erosion that extended back over the last 10,000 years how many of the past megastorms they identified were hurricanes?

Bierman works extensively communicating science to the pubic. He teaches summer science programs for highly motivated high school students, directs a public web site (www.uvm.edu/landscape) holding over 70,000 photographs of historic Vermont landscapes, has been co-author since 2005 of Pipkin et al., an introductory Environmental Geology textbook, and is the lead author of a new, NSF-funded textbook, Key Concepts in Geomorphology, that uses extensive visuals and photographs to teach about the workings of Earths surface.


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Andrew Biewener

Andrew Biewener is the Charles P. Lyman Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, and Director of the Concord Field Station. He teaches introductory and advanced courses in anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics. His research focuses on the comparative biomechanics and neuromuscular control of mammalian and avian locomotion, with relevance to biorobotics. He is currently Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Experimental Biology. He also served as President of the American Society of Biomechanics.


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Ira Blei

Ira Blei was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, where he attended public schools and graduated from Brooklyn College with B.S. and M.A. degrees in chemistry. After receiving Ph.D. degrees in physical biochemistry from Rutgers University, he worked for Lever Brothers Company in New Jersey, studying the effects of surface-active agents on skin. His next position was a Melpar Incorporated, in Virginia, where he founded a biophysics group that researched methods for the detection of terrestrial and extraterrestrial microorganisms. In 1967, Ira joined the faculty of the College of Staten Island, City University of New York, and taught chemistry and biology there for three decades. His research has appeared in the Journal of Colloid Science, the Journal of Physical Chemistry, and the Archives of Biophysical and Biochemical Science. He has two sons, one an engineer working in Berkeley, California, and the other a musician who lives and works in San Francisco. Ira is outdoors whenever possible, overturning dead branches to see what lurks beneath or scanning the trees with binoculars in search of new bird life, and has recently served as president of Staten island’s local Natural History Club.


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Bruce Bolt

Bruce Bolt (late) was Professor Emeritus of Seismology and former Director of the Seismographic Stations at the University of California, Berkeley. He was frequently called upon to consult on earthquake hazard reduction, and helped estimate the likely strong ground motions affecting major structures in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York, San Diego, and South Carolina.  Bolt passed away in 2005.


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Janet L. Branchaw

Janet Branchaw is a Faculty Associate at the University of Wisconsin--Madison's Center for Biology Education.  She earned her B.S. in Zoology from Iowa State University and her Ph.D. in Physiology from the University of Wisconsin--Madison.  After completing postdoctoral training and a lectureship in undergraduate and medical physiology at the University of Wisconsin--Madison's School of Medicine and Public Health, Janet joined the University's Center for Biology Education.  Her work at the Center focuses on developing and supporting undergraduate students for graduate school.  She developed and directs two National Science Foundation--funded undergraduate research programs; a 10-week summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates program that hosts students from around the country, and a three-year Undergraduate Research and Mentoring program that prepares students in science, technology, engineering, and math disciplines for interdisciplinary graduate training across the biological sciences.  In connection with this work she collaborates with the Delta Program for Research, Teaching and Learning and the Wisconsin Program for Scientific Teaching to train pre-faculty and faculty mentors of undergraduate researchers.  In addition to her work in undergraduate research, Janet also teaches introductory biology.


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Marnie Branfireun

Marnie Branfireun is an Instructor in the Centre for Environment
and Sustainability at Western University in London, Ontario. She teaches in
both the Undergraduate Environmental Science Program and the Masters in
Environment and Sustainability Program. Her BSc (University of Manitoba)
focused on aquatic ecology, during which she worked for the Department of
Fisheries and Oceans monitoring benthic organisms in Manitoba rivers and at
the Experimental Lakes Area. Her MSc (McGill University) was on mercury
cycling and plant decomposition in boreal peatlands. As an ecologist, she
has been engaged in environmental education, conservation, restoration, and
monitoring for over 20 years.


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Anthony Bretscher

Anthony Bretscher is Professor of Cell Biology at Cornell University. His laboratory is well known for identifying and characterizing new components of the actin cytoskeleton, and elucidating their biological functions in relation to cell polarity and membrane traffic. For this work, his laboratory exploits biochemical, genetic and cell biological approaches in two model systems, vertebrate epithelial cells and the budding yeast. Dr. Bretscher teaches cell biology to graduate students at Cornell University.


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Rebecca Brewer

Rebecca Brewer received her Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, where her area of research was developing rapid analytical methods for field-testing contaminated ground water and soil. She taught graduate-level courses in analytical chemistry at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut, part-time while working full-time at Cytec Industries, Stamford, Connecticut. More recently, she was a full-time faculty member at Regis University in Denver, Colorado, where she taught the general, organic, and biochemistry course for five years. Becky is currently working full-time in industry, doing pharmaceutical research and development for Sandoz, Inc. in Broomfield, Colorado.


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Displaying 16-30 of 287